Truthbutter

Category Archives: Nutrition And Health

A Microbial Revelation

Bacteria

This weekend, I experienced a crazy paradigm shift. For the better part of four years, I’ve been investigating how people can get healthy and stay healthy, and I’ve been almost entirely focused on food and nutrition. Sure, I looked at other things as well – stress, exercise, sleep – but to me, what determined whether you were sick or well was diet. All you had to do was figure out what foods your body liked best, eat those, and you’d be good to go! Maybe some choice supplementation here or there, especially for tough cases like mine, but nutrition was definitely most important. Read more →

Remember the Microbiome!

Human Food Project

Human Food Project!

Hey everyone! This is going to be a really quick post because this week is a little crazy, but I wanted to tell you about a petition that I really think you should sign! It only takes about 30 seconds, and if you care at all about the health or well-being of yourself, your friends and family, or other Americans, this pertains to you. If you DON’T care about the health or well-being of yourself, your friends and family, or other Americans, then you should probably find a different blog to read.

I’m going to do a much bigger post (probably a series) on the human microbiome in the future, because it’s truly a fascinating topic, and one that is near and dear to my heart. There are countless microbes hanging out in your gut at this very moment, and the makeup of your gut flora can largely determine whether you suffer from obesity or diabetes, chronic inflammation, or a weak immune system, not to mention the more obvious connection with digestive health. You can visit the Human Food Project website for tons of information on the human microbiome.

Anyways, back to the petition! This is a petition to make sure that the next edition of the Dietary Guidelines, set to be released in 2015, address gut flora and the microbiome. As you can see from the above links, your gut flora essentially determines whether you’re healthy or you aren’t, so don’t you think it deserves a mention in the Dietary Guidelines for Americans? I’d hazard a guess that the vast majority of Americans don’t even realize they have a microbiome, much less that it could be the reason they’re obese and diabetic. So please, take 30 seconds and sign the petition so that we can make sure the 2015 Dietary Guidelines address the human microbiome!

Why The Dietary Guidelines are Wrong about Cholesterol

This is a research paper that I wrote for my English class this semester. I wanted to share it on this blog because it’s about eggs, cholesterol, and the Dietary Guidelines, three things that definitely impact the ancestral health community! 

Abstracthappy eggs

With rising rates of obesity and diabetes, most Americans feel more pressure than ever to make the right food choices. However, the country’s primary source of nutritional guidance – the Dietary Guidelines for Americans – has been criticized for being misleading, inaccurate, and potentially harmful to public health. In this paper, I present eggs as a ‘case study’ to strengthen the criticisms that others have brought against the Dietary Guidelines. The Guidelines advocate limiting egg consumption because of their high cholesterol content. However, having reviewed the scientific literature on cholesterol and health, I conclude that there is no documented health benefit to limiting dietary cholesterol. Additionally, eggs are an excellent source of choline, a nutrient that is sorely lacking in the diets of most Americans. For these reasons, the Dietary Guidelines should actually encourage egg consumption, rather than limit it.

  Read more →

My Story (to be continued…)

Ever since I can remember, I’ve eaten an extremely healthy diet. That is, healthy by the USDA’s standards. My friends in middle school would make fun of me for having Triscuits and cheese and a bag of raw veggies for lunch, while they had muffins or pizza.

Sometime during middle school, I decided to be vegetarian. I also meticulously removed as much saturated fat and cholesterol from my diet as possible, and I rarely ate anything that wasn’t whole grain. Now keep in mind, I was never overweight. In fact, I’ve been underweight almost my entire life, and I got even skinnier after these self-imposed dietary changes. But whenever somebody told me that I didn’t have to worry about eating a little ‘unhealthy’ food, I would fiercely reply that skinny people can die of heart disease, too. Read more →